Saturday, September 26, 2020

David Oistrakh - Tchaikovsky Violin D Major Op 35 allegro moderato

 

Tchaikovsky Violin D Major Op 35 allegro moderato

The music piece is the first of the three movements of Concerto violin D Major Op 35 that Tchaikovsky wrote in 1881.  Originally, the entire piece was dedicated to violinist Leopold Auer but he turned his nose up calling it too difficult and too radical to play.  Tchaikovsky had to wait three years until the right violinist would come along.  Brodsky had a go at it, which became a big hit in London.  Eventually, the music would arrive in Moscow.  By then, Tchaikovsky would have completed the mighty quartet of violin concertos produced in the nineteenth century.

I do not own the copyright to the music, the recording and the photos. (Image post and video art were appropriated from the original album.) This video is posted for educational use under Section 17 U.S. Code § 107. Limitations on exclusive rights: Fair use. Hope you enjoy. 

sDg.


Wednesday, September 23, 2020

Shelly Manne and his Band vol 4 (side 1 of mono vinyl album)



For me the interesting thing about collecting jazz records is that I get to discover jazz artists from another jazz artist. Such is the case here. I've never heard of Shelly Manne before until I started collecting used vinyl records. I had no idea what he played and how he sounded. Then I saw his name on the album cover of one of the jazz records I already listened to - must have been one from Howard McGhee, whom I heard from Dizzie Gillispie, whom I heard from Miles Davis, and who has never heard of Miles.

I find that vinyl record was made for jazz. There is something organic about it. When I play the same song back to back from a CD to a vinyl the difference is huge. Most of the CDs of old school jazz recordings are remastered from analog recording tapes and made to sound clean. Not a bad approach but the result can sterilize the sound too much that the dynamics are lost. The energy is lost. Of course one complaints about vinyl records is that you have to put up with the pops and crackles, and at times some annoying hisses. That has never been an issue for me. I actually don't mind them because for me they are parts of the experience. Whenever I listen to jazz on vinyl I feel like I'm living in the past when these songs were written and performed. I like to share this particular video from the Shelly Manne Vol 4 album because I think it's worth listening to the recording. I hope you would enjoy as much as I did.

Sheldon Manne (June 11, 1920 – September 26, 1984), professionally known as Shelly Manne, was an American jazz drummer. Most frequently associated with West Coast jazz, he was known for his versatility and also played in a number of other styles, including Dixieland, swing, bebop, avant-garde jazz and fusion, as well as contributing to the musical background of hundreds of Hollywood films and television programs. - (excerpt from Wikipedia - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shelly_Manne)

Alto Saxophone – Charlie Mariano Bass – Leroy Vinnegar Design [Cover] – Guidi Drums – Shelly Manne Engineer – Val Valentin Photography By [Cover Photo] – Fred Lyon Photography By [Rear Cover] – Lester Koenig Piano – Russ Freeman Supervised By [Technical] – Roy DuNann Trumpet – Stu Williamson Recorded on Jan.19th, Jan.26th and Feb.2nd, 1956 in Los Angeles. I do not own the copyright to the music, the recording and the photos. (Video Artwork was appropriated from the original album. ) This video is posted for educational use under Section 17 U.S. Code § 107. Limitations on exclusive rights: Fair use.




Monday, September 21, 2020

Art Hodes Plays Bugle Call Rag

 


Art Hodes Plays Bugle Call Rag...

... From the album is Jazz Classics Original Blue Note Jazz, Volume 1 featuring Edmond Hall on side 1 and Art Hodes on side 2. Side 1 recorded in November 29, 1943, side 2 recorded in June 1, 1944. Published in 1952 and 1962. It's amazing that copies of this album are still out there. My copy is falling apart. Arthur W. Hodes (November 14, 1904 – March 4, 1993), known professionally as Art Hodes, was an American jazz pianist. A committed jazz traditionalist, Hodes was often at odds with proponents of the bebop movement in the 1940s. One of his forums was a radio program on WNYC out of New York City. He also published and wrote for the magazine Jazz Record; his columns appear in the collection Selections from the Gutter (1977). [excerpt from Britannica https://www.britannica.com/biography/Art-Hodes] I would categorize the songs performed by Hodes in this album in the style of New Orleans jazz. Others who are familiar with Art Hodes might disagree and would say he belongs to the Chicago style jazz. And yet, Hodes considered himself a swing man, a jazzman who typically would be associated with big bands. "I was always a 'swing' man," Hodes wrote in 1988. "But I could also play it pretty." I left some parts of the vinyl scratches in reproducing the songs in this album. I felt that the noise added to the era of smoked filled dance floor, champagne and cocktail glasses clinging, and the swinging vibe of glamour culture. Personally, I felt a lot of the hype was shallow - hiding behind sophistication and idiocy - reminiscent of the Dada Movement. But let me not get too far ahead of myself. The point of listening to the song is reimagining jazz as it were back then. As a side note, the music style was probably waning when the songs were recorded in 1944. I do not own the copyright to the music, the recording and the photos. (Video Artwork was appropriated from William Gottlieb/Library of Congress and the album Art Hodes – I Remember Bessie. The video clip of spinning turntable is from Atakan Ozkan https://www.pexels.com/@atakan-ozkan-1068907.) This video is posted for educational use under Section 17 U.S. Code § 107. Limitations on exclusive rights: Fair use. Hope you enjoy. sDg.